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This is a transcript of the interview Steve Fox did with Plant and Page on ABC's _Good Morning America_ that aired October 12th. GMA: In the 1970's, a band called Led Zeppelin turned the decibels way up, and turned on rock fans with its heavy, hard-hitting, no-nonsense music. Now, for the first time in fourteen years, two of its driving forces, Robert Plant and Jimmy Page, have formally reunited for an MTV special airing tonight, called _Unledded_. Last night in New York City, our Steve Fox had a rare conversation with both Jimmy Page and Robert Plant about working together after all those years. Plant: Well, we'd been encouraged time and time again-- Fox: Yeah. Plant: --but often the encouragement was quite sort of base, and I didn't really think that the Led Zeppelin story should have such a sticky end. Plus we had a couple of reunions which I thought were pretty substandard [Page nods], where we didn't prepare for it properly. And there's quite a lot of resp-- quasi-responsi- bility carrying the name. Fox: When you decided to work together again, the first time around, was there any awkwardness or uncomfortableness, or did it just click. Plant: Well, we didn't really know each other, did we-- Page: No-- Plant: --not really,-- Page: --no-- Plant: --but we knew-- Page: --I mean, we did, but we didn't, you know. There was a lot of space that had been between us, you know. Plant: I think there was always the thought-- Page: But that-- Plant: --that it could be an arranged marriage. I wanted it to be a real thing where we go forward-- Page: Yeah. Plant: --rather than sideways and play just the hits. So by elaborating some of the existing stuff, opening it up and making it a bit more-- giving it a bit of character that it never had before, and-- it gives us a future. ["Battle of Evermore" from _Unledded_] Plant: Got the imagination back real quick. Fox: Did you. Plant: Yeah, and I think that what-- Fox: That must have been sort of gratifying-- Plant: Yeah, what it-- Fox: --to see it click like that. [Page makes noise of agreement] Plant: Well, I was only going to give it a certain amount of time-- Page: I knew *he* was. [simultaneously with] Plant: --and I'm sure Jimmy was the same. [Page and Fox laugh] Well, you know, we're not the Everly Brothers. We're the "Neverly Brothers." Fox: Let's talk about "Gallows Pole." What's new about the way you're doing it this time around, and-- Page: The way that the whole thing jelled together was totally different. Plant: And the difference is that it's urgent, anxious, exciting, it's-- there's a whole different personnel. Fourteen or fifteen years ago, Led Zeppelin might have been a little tired and jaded. Whatever we do now is at the beginning of another cycle. So the major difference to everything that you're discussing here is attitude and the fact that it's all fresh. ["Gallows Pole" from _Unledded_] Fox: You guys were legendary for partying, for hedonistic behavior. I don't want to drag up the old stories. My question is-- Plant: Weren't you in a football team once? Fox: Yeah, I was, actually. Plant: And didn't you guys used to sort of let your hair down-- Fox: A little bit-- Plant: Did you used to have long hair a little? Fox: Yes, I did-- Plant: Yeah? I thought so-- Fox: --a little bit longer. Plant: --yeah. Fox: Are *you* different now? Are the times different? What? Plant: Speculation is speculation. Who knows what's what. Every, you know-- If you live some kind of existentialist, you know, life, anything can happen in a minute, 'round the corner. ["Kashmir" from _Unledded_] Fox: In the session you did to perform "Kashmir," you performed with an orchestral section, a string ensemble. What was that all about? Page: We already knew we wanted to be totally enveloped in this Western orchestra this side [gesturing], and the Egyptian this side, to feel this whole force that was going on, and this joy and jubilation. It was wonderful. Fox: Was it? What, what is it-- Page: Yeah, yeah. And it was transmitting between the Egyptians and the Western string players who are usually very, very reserved, you know, with their playing. ["Wah Wah" from _Unledded_] Fox: Who were the ["guh-now'-wah"] and how did you come to play with them? Plant: They were brought back as slaves, and they're central African in descent, and they have nothing to do with the north African cultural music. And they play a kind of music which is much more akin to the music of the Mississippi delta here than it is to do with Arab music. It's haunting, seductive, and quite alluring. And it's a great challenge for us. Fox: Is it rock and roll? Plant: It's Moroccan roll. Page: I don't like all those categories myself. Fox: The categories. Page: Yeah, putting things in pigeon holes, you know. It's all-- It's all music to me. GMA: Nice to hear them back together again.

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