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Folks... my mother sent me this article from The Philadelphia Inquirer...obviously it's a bit late, but I thought it had some interesting things to say: PAGE AND PLANT ARE BACK AS UNLEDDED By Ira Robbins Newsday When drummer John Bonham's alcohol-aided asphyxiation stopped Led Zeppelin in its tracks 14 years ago, the group underwent a seamless transformation from the reigning monarch of baleful hard-guitar rock to a mystical presence overlooking every would-be metalhead and power balladeer. The band's music has remained an inescapable staple of classic-rock radio, and various reissue projects have kept the gold and platinum records rolling in. But with a couple of exceptions-Live Aid in '85 and Atlantic Records' birthday bash in '88- the groups three survivors have let Led Zeppelin rest on its ever-growing myth, quashing countless reunion rumors along the way. Welcome to the second coming. Singer Robert Plant and guitarist Jimmy Page have finally rejoined their fortunes in a full-fledged return to evermore, now glibly known as Unledded. Tonight at 10, cable's MTV will premiere _Jimmy Page/Robert Plant (Unledded)_ a 90 minute special of Zep classics and new compostitions filmed in August before two small audiences in London, as well as on location in Morocco and Wales. _No Quarter- Jimmy Page and Robert Plant (Unledded)_, an album from the same sessions, is due Nov. 8; details of an American tour scheduled to begin in February are to be announced soon. Although much of the material in Unledded's repertoire is familiar, the arr- angements take enough liberties to justify their reactivation. Soem of the arrangements feature strings, horns, and Egyptian and Moroccan musicians on violins, drums, finger cymbals and _nay_ (Arab woodwind) in addition to a well-rehearsed acoustic-and-electric rock group and a hurdy-gurdy grinder. The recordings from and in and around Marrakech, done by Plant and Page with local Gnaoui players and female Berber vocalists, are far more exotic. Evidently as much for their own creative sensibilities as prudence in not trying to comete with their exalted past, Plant and Page have moved to reinvigorate the old songs with ambitious new approaches. Not surprisingly, the Eastern imaginings of "Kashmir" have been made more literal; on the other hand, an acoustic campfire version of "Gallow's Pole" (already being shown on MTV) is pretty much what you'd expect from acoustic Zeppelin. Other numbers filmed and recorded for Unledded's first outing include "Four Sticks," "The Battle of Evermore," "Since I've Been Loving You," "What Is and What Should Never Be," "Nobody's Fault but Mine" and "Friends." Two things notably missing from the Unledded schema are "Stairway to Heaven" and bassist-keyboardist John Paul Jones. Asked in a Spinal Tap-ish promotional video whether Jones-whose recent deviations from the mainstream include a partnership with aural terrorist Diamanda Galas- had been invited to take part in Unledded, Plant (who now looks like John Steed from _The Avengers_ in a wig) answers the question with a dodge: "I didn't want to confuse the issue. We just wanted to try it out and see how far we could get. The thing is to make it as simple as you can. The more focused you can be, the better." For his part, Jones told Britian's Vox magazine: "Nobody bothered to call me...I thought it was a bit discourteous. Having to read it in the papers was kind of odd. Good luck to them, I suppose." As for the process by which they selected material, Plant's comment is: "There are certain songs that, for me, are not appropriate to sing anymore." He cites "Black Dog" as one he wouldn't do; Page adds that they tried the third album's "Bron-Y-Aur Stomp" and abandoned it.

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