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Date: Mon, 7 Nov 1994 11:16:55 -0500 From: "Jonathan L. Leybovich" Subject: Another Review Here's a review of Unledded from the "Chicago Tribune, November 6, 1994" by Greg Kot: No Quarter: Jimmy Page and Robert Plant Unledded" **1/2 This takes the "Unplugged format to its most absurd extremes, with the principals performing with a London orchestra, an 11-piece Egyptian ensemble and Moroccan percussionists. The vdeo follows the duo to the hills of Wales and the streets of Marrakech, with Page wrestling three-headed guitars and Plant whirling like a blond-maned shaman. It's as though Led Zeppelin and the days of rock excess never left. Indeed, it was just this sort of pomposity that Plant so resolutely staved off for so many years. With John Bonham's death in 1980, the singer vowed never to reunite the band. Guess he was just kidding. To his credit, Plant avoids nostalgia as he plunges back into the Zep canon, tuning down the blues-rock swagger in favor of a more mystical, Middle Eastern vibe. But if Plant's singing is occasionally a thrilling departure, Page's accoustic strumming is no substitute for the blood and thunder of the original. The duo deserve credit for at least trying to shake things up a bit- this sounds less lke the original Zeppelin than Page's recent collaboration with Plant clone David Coverdale. But the three new songs are only tentatively steps away from the old Zep bluster, and some of the oldies sound like desperate attempts to fix something that wasn't broke in the first place. The most overwrought remake is "Kashmir", which makes at least one listener glad these two didn't try their hand at "Stairway to Heavan". [End Review]

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