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Date: Sun, 13 Nov 1994 16:41:51 -0500 From: wrtiede@netcom.com (Bill Tiede) Subject: No Quarter Review, Dallas Morning News 11/13/94 The following is taken from today's Dallas Morning News, verbatim: "Page and Plant bridge the grunge gap", by Michael Corcoran, staff critic Although the post-Led Zeppelin careers of Jimmy Page and Robert Plant have been firmly unremarkable, dripping with honey but not much adrenalin, the guitarist and singer have joined together to make an album that, amazingly, picks up where their former band left off. If Zep hadn't broken up in 1980, after the death of drummer John Bonham, and kept making records, this is the one they would have made in 1994. A mix of adventurous new songs such as "City Don't Cry" and new treatments of Zep tunes like "Kashmir", "Nobody's Fault But Mine" and "The Battle of Evermore", this LP sounds like it all goes together, welded by Moroccan rhythms and the arm- stretched majesty of old. It could be that Mr. Page and Mr. Plant have glossed over the fact that they're not young men anymore by finding the vitality that exotic world music has given to the sagging artistry of Paul Simon and David Byrne. But Led Zeppelin has always sought inspiration from afar, and it's the kind of band that, faced with the loss of a step or two, would've just found a new way to walk. There must be something about the Led Zeppelin mind-set --- to be simultaneously grounded and spacey, making music about medieval demons for girls in halter tops --- that stirs the juices in its two chief songwriters. This MTV-prodded "Unledded" reunion is that rare case of a highly anticipated project that sounds as good coming from the speakers as it did on paper. The controversy over whether Led Zeppelin was overwrought or "out there" seems to be settled by this new LP. On occasion, the band's mystical pretensions do seem ridiculously outdated, recalling the Stonehenge scene from "This Is Spinal Tap." But for the most part, "No Quarter" is rich with thrilling musical moments. Though credited only to its frontmen, this is very much a Led Zeppelin record. It's not close to being the best Led Zep rec, but it's still better than Stone Temple Pilots or Offspring. [end of article]

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