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Article 14839 of rec.music.misc: >From: rsk@s.cc.purdue.edu (Rich Kulawiec) Subject: Revised SF-in-music List (LONG) Keywords: music, sf, fantasy Message-ID: <3188@s.cc.purdue.edu> Date: 15 Jun 88 15:33:28 GMT Organization: Purdue Computing Center Unix Systems Staff This is the revised SF-in-music list. It covers pop music only, thus avoiding the huge amount of material which might be called "classical". It does cover rock, jazz, folk, and electronic music; most of the items listed here fall pretty well into these categories. This choice, and the separate listing of the pure instrumentalists at the end, are mine, so don't flame anybody else for them. I did try to list everybody who helped at the end, in an informal way. In many cases, I've relied on the contributions that have been sent in; in others, I've verified spellings and attributions. Thus, the accuracy of the information is uneven; so be it. Corrections (via mail ONLY) are quite welcome, as are additions. I will be maintaining this list and re-sending it periodically. -- Rich Kulawiec, rsk@s.cc.purdue.edu, s.cc.purdue.edu!rsk -- 1919: Has an EP "Machine". AC/DC: "Who Made Who" from the Maximum Overdrive soundtrack. Alan Parsons Project: Albums "I, Robot" (but not based on Asimov) and "Tales of Mystery and Imagination (Poe). Ambrosia: "Nice, Nice, Very Nice" is from the 53rd Calypso of Bokonon from Cat's Cradle by Vonnegut. Also "Time Waits for no One"; both are on "Ambrosia", which also contains a reading of Jabberwocky. Amon Duul II: Some sf-oriented material; German band from the mid-seventies. Two of their albums are "Made in Germany" and "Vive La Trance". Anderson, Laurie: Surrealism & sf-type music. Try "Oh, Superman" and "Language is a Virus From Outer Space", which I seem to recall is derived from Burroughs. Android Sisters, The: "Songs of Electronic Despair". Androids of MU: A punk band that never got anywhere; their album "Blood Robots" includes a track called "Lost in Space". Ange: (French progressive group) "Au-dela du delire" is a time-travel story. Anvil: "Mothra" Aphrodite's Child: The album "666" is the veritable armageddon waltz. Vangelis was in this band back then. Asia: "After the War", from "Astra" refers to post-WW III era. B-52's: "Planet Claire", and "53 Miles West of Venus" from Wild Planet. Bedford, David: Album "Star's End"; could this be a reference to Asimov's Foundation series ("Star's End", "Tazenda")? Benatar, Pat: "My Clone Sleeps Alone". Black Sabbath: Sort of. Tends to black magic et. al. See "Paranoid" for "Iron Man" (mechanical golem?), "Black Sabbath" (1st LP) for demented ravings like "Behind the Wall of Sleep" (Lovecraft). "Heaven and Hell" is all fantasy. Some speculation that "Iron Man" refers to the comic book hero (paraplegic w/special iron alloy suit and powers far beyond...) Blake, Tim: Electronic New Age. Albums "Crystal Machine", "Blake's New Jerusalem", both SF. Was in Hawkwind 1979-80. Blondie: SF themes in some songs: e.g. the "Man from Mars" in "Rapture". Blue Oyster Cult: Many tracks on many albums with SF themes; "Soul Survivor" and "Veteran of the Psychic Wars" (which also was on the "Heavy Metal" soundtrack) from "Fire of Unknown Origin", "E.T.I.", "The Subhuman", "Flaming Telepaths" and most of the rest of the LP's "Tyranny and Mutation" and "Secret Treaties". Later work includes the album "Cultosaurus Erectus", "Godzilla" (from "Some Enchanted Evening") and "Black Blade" (from "E.T. Live", a song done with Michael Moorcock). Boney M.: "Night Flight to Venus" (title track of LP), and "Stepenvolf", a werewolf story, on the same LP. Bonzo Dog DooDah Band: "Urban Spaceman" from "The Best of the Bonzos", and "There's a Monster Coming" from "Gorilla". Boston: The LP "Third Stage" has a track emulating aspaceship take-off. Bow Wow Wow: Punk. "I want my baby on Mars", "Giant sized baby thing!". Bowie, David: "Space Oddity" (most emphatically NOT "Major Tom") discusses eerie experiences in orbit. Also has a film, "The Man who Fell to Earth". See also "Diamond Dogs" (mutated life on earth after the bomb) and "Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars", about a rock band on an earth with five years left, which includes "The Man Who Sold the World", "Life on Mars", and "TVC15". See also "Five Years", "Ashes to Ashes", "Starman", and "Memory of a Free Festival", and "1984". Also, "Cat People (Putting out the Fire)" from "Let's Dance", the title song to the movie. Buggles, The: The LP "Age of Plastic" contains many SF themes;for instance, the title song has the lines "They send the Heart Police to put you under cardiac arrest" (1984 meets Harlan Ellison's Ticktockman?) Also "I Love You, Miss Robot". See also "Johnny on the Monorail". Bunnydrums: "PKD", for Phillip K. Dick. Bush, Kate: "Breathing", about breathing the fallout following a nuclear blast, is from "Never Forever", and "Expiriment IV" from "The Whole Story" about designing a sound that can kill. Also "Cloudbusting", about a girl whose father builds a rain-making machine and is kidnapped by the government. Byrds, The: "Hey Mr. Spaceman" from "The Fifth Dimension". "Space Odyssey" from "Notorious Byrd Brothers" is a retelling of Clarke's "The Sentinel". Camel: Lots of fantasy stuff on various albums, notably "Mirage". Captain Beyond: "Astral Lady", "Voyagers From Distant Planets", etc. Caravan: "Cthulhu" from "Girls Who Grow Plump in the Night". Cheap Trick: "Dream Police" (title track). Chicago: Last side of Chicago III is a suite about ecodeath and final war; title unknown. Cooper, Alice: On "School's Out", the words "Klattu barrada nicto" occur in background vocals near the end of "My Stars". The album "Alice Cooper Goes to Hell" is a fantasy. Also see "I'm Flash" (Gordon, that is). Crack the Sky: "Robots for Ronnie" off "Crack the Sky" (not about Ronnie Reagan, but could easily be adapted!). "Invaders from Mars" off "Animal Notes" (the martians are coming for our hero, but he doesn't care, 'cause it's probably better over there!). "Nuclear Apathy" off "Safety in Numbers" discusses how the situation looks to those on the Moon. Credence Clearwater Revival: "Who'll Stop the Rain" (post-holocaust?), "It Come Out of the Sky". Creme, Lol/Kevin Godley: "Consequences" is an ecological parable. Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young: "Wooden Ships"--post-nuclear war survival? DeBurgh, Chris: "The Vision", "The Leader", and "What About Me?", a three-song series from "Into the Light" discusses the Revelation, which may or may not be a fantasy, depending on your viewpoint. See "A Spaceman Came Travelling" and "The Tower" from "Spanish Train", "The Girl With April in Her Eyes" from "Crusader", "Sight and Touch" from "Man on the Line" (post-WW3), and "Don't Pay the Ferryman" from "The Getaway". Deep Fix: Michael Moorcock's band of the late seventies-produced one album, "The New Worlds Fair". A sort of cross between rock and slow square dance. Deep Purple: Occasional forays into SF. "Space Truckin'", from "Machine Head". "The Mule", from "Fireball" (Asimov's 'Foundation'?). Def Leppard: Heavy Metal. First album ("On Through The Night" has a futuristic track, "When the Walls Came Tumblin' Down", and a fantasy "Overture". Devo: "Q: Are we not men? A: We are DEVO" and "Duty Now for the Future" are full of SF themes; examples are "Space Junk" and "Jocko Homo". "Freedom of Choice" and "New Traditionalists" also have some SF material. Dolby, Thomas: "Golden Age of Wireless" is mostly (if not all) songs about science/technology and man. "The Flat Earth" also contains these themes to a lesser extent. Donovan (w/Paul McCartney): "Atlantis" (Georg Danzer translated and sang a German version.) Duran Duran: "Planet Earth" Dylan, Bob: "Talkin' World War III Blues" Electric Light Orchestra: "Mission (A World Record)" on "A New World Record". The entire album "Time" involves a man from 1981 winding up in the 21st century. The "10538 Overture" is a dystopia set in that year. (Although closer examination of the lyrics indicates that "10538" might be a person, not a year.) Eloy: (German/Swiss electronic progressive rock) See "Ocean", the atlantis myth; "Planets","Time to Turn", a two album story of fantasy with a twist. (It's about "the rise and fall of the most beautiful planet in the universe, Salta".) Also, "Giant" from "Colours" and "Night Riders" and "Metromania" from "Metromania", about the high tech near future. Elvis Costello: "Tokyo Storm Warning" from "Blood and Chocolate"; mentions Japanese horror/sf movies. Emerald Web: (small obscure west coast duo [flute & synthesizer]) New age material, but one album is "Dragon Wings and Wizard Tales", a fantasy story set to music. Emerson, Lake, & Palmer: Space battle in "Karn Evil 9" from "Brain Salad Surgery". See also "Tarkus". Eno, Brian: Albums: "Apollo" and "On Land". Erickson, Roky: "The Evil One" has a track entitled "Creature with the Atom Brain" Eurythmics: Did the soundtrack to the recent version of "1984". FM: The album "Black Noise" is entirely SF, and deal with topics such as suspended animation; "RocketRoll" from "Surveillance" is about SF Rock. Firm: "Star Trekkin'". Fink Brothers: "Mutants in Mega City One", from 2000AD comic (origin of Judge Dredd). America portrayed as three cities under police control. Flanders & Swann: "The Road Goes Ever On", settings of Tolkein songs. Flash & the Pan: "California", "Atlantis Calling". Flash Fearless and the Zorg Women, parts 5&6: Another weird IGTB type collaboration album from the late 70's with some well-known rockers on it. Fleetwood Mac: "The Green Manalishi with the Two-Pronged Crown". (Judas Priest did an eminently forgettable version) "Rhiannon" might be about a Welsh witch. Flock, The: "Dinosaur Swamps" Gabriel Bondage: "Another Trip to Earth" (LP), religious/fantasy mixture. Gabriel, Peter: "Here Comes the Flood", with Robert Fripp. Genesis: "Watcher of the Skies" (from "Foxtrot") and "One for the Vine" from "Wind and Wuthering" concern time travel; perhaps "The Return of the Giant Hogweed" (Hello Triffids, from "Nursery Cryme"), "The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway" (surrealism), and "A Trick of the Tail" (fantasy). Oh, and "Get 'em Out by Friday" (from "Foxtrot"). See also "Keep it Dark" in which visiting aliens persuade the person they contact to remain silent about the visit. More stuff: "Am I Very Wrong", "Solitude", "The Knife" (from "Trespass"), "The Musical Box" (horror, from "Nursery Cryme"), "The Fountain of Salmacis" (fantasy, from "Nursery Cryme"), "Supper's Ready" (the ultimate battle of good and evil, from "Foxtrot"), "Firth of Fifth", and Dancing Out with the Moonlit Knight" (both containing heavy fantasy elements, both from "Selling England by the Pound"). See also "Squonk", and "The Lady Lies" from "...And Then There Were Three...", a fantasy about a traveller captured by a demon in the form of a young woman. Gentle Giant: Much material, tending towards fantasy including "The Advent of Panurge", and "Alucard" (spell it backwards). Gong: New Age before anyone had coined the label "new age". Three albums about the Planet Gong, Zero the Hero & the Pot-Head Pixies!: "Radio Gnome", "Angel's Egg", "You". Gowan, Larry: See "Oceania" from "Gowan" (first LP) might refer to Oceana. See also "Strange Animal", his second LP. Greenslade, David: "The Pentateuch of the Cosmogony", a double album of electronic music. A derelict alien spaceship enters our solar system. Their language is decoded (details in the accompanying illustrated book); the music is the story of their race. H.P. Lovecraft: Couple of albums...one contains "At the Mountains of Madness". Estimates place them in the late 60's. Another track is "The White Ship", directly referencing an H.P. Lovecraft story. Hackett, Steve: "Narnia" on "Please Don't Touch" (one of his solo albums;he was with Genesis). His album "Voyage of the Acolyte" isbased on the Tarot, and includes "Star of Sirius", "The Hands of the Princess", "A Tower Struck Down", "The Lovers", "The Hermit", "The Shadow of the Hierophant", and "Ace of Wands". Hagar, Sammy: "There's a Crack in the Earth". Hawkwind: The all-time consensus champion for sf-oriented rock. *Some* of their albums are: "Hall of the Mountain Grill", "In Search of Space", "Quark, Strangeness, and Charm", "Space Ritual--Alive in Liverpool & London", "Warrior on the Edge of Time", "In Search of Space", "Doremi Fasol Latido", "Astounding Sounds, Amazing Music","25 Years On", "Levitation", "Sonic Attack", "Church of the Hackwind", and "Choose Your Masks". Michael Moorcock, long associated with the group, has in fact written some fantasy-sf,including "Time of the Hawklords", a fantasy about the band saving the world. He co-wrote "Veteran of the Psychic Wars", from the soundtrack of "Heavy Metal". He also released a solo album late in the 70's. Many of their tracks are explicitly linked to SF books,e.g. "Lord of Light", "Jack of Shadows", "Damnation Alley" (Zelazny), "Steppenwolf" (Hesse), "High Rise" (Ballard). The lyrics of "Warriors" are taken from Moorcock's "The Eternal Champion"; the lyrics to another spoken track on "Space Ritual" from his book "The Black Corridor" The lyrics of "The Awakening", "Spirit of the Age" and "The 10 Seconds of Forever", are SF poems from Robert Calvert's collection of poems, "Centigrade 232". Robert Calvert was lead singer of Hawkwind from 1976-1978 (or thereabouts) and produced a solo album late in the 70's. Hendrix, Jimi: Delta blues, except that the delta is on Mars. See "1983...A Merman I Should Turn to Be","Hey Baby", and "Third Stone from the Sun", "UFO", and lots of other stuff. Hillage, Steve: His album "Green" includes an instrumental called "UFO over Paris". Hitchcock, Robyn: See "The Fly", "Man with the Light Bulb Head". Huey Lewis & the News: "Back in Time" from the "Back to the Future" soundtrack. Human League: "I Am the Law", also from Judge Dredd (futuristic cop) comic. Process of apprehension, trial, conviction, and sentencing telescoped into a very short time period. Also "Black Hit of Space" from the "Travelogue" album. Top 40 hit songs arrives from space and takes over the charts. "Circus of Death" from "Reproduction" (and misc EPs) mentions that the last verse is spoken by "the last man on earth"...it is actually a drug song. Also "Seconds" from "Dare!", about a scientist blinding the dictator of an African country with a laser. Icehouse: "Icehouse" contains "Icehouse" which seems to be a gothic tale of some sort (haven't heard the album in a while) and "Sister" which is about a computer/android (not sure which off-hand for same reason above). IGTB: Stands for Inter-Galactic Touring Band; Mish-mash album put out in 1977 with all sorts of people on it, purporting to be a group on galactic tour. Incredible String Band: "I Was a Young Man (back in the 1960's)", a future retrospective. See also "Swift as the Wind", wherein a child's fantasy-hero turns out to be more substantial. Inner City Unit: Punk band led by Nik Turner of Hawkwind. Their first album, "Pass Out", includes the tracks "Fall Out" (nuclear war), "Polly Ethelene", "Cybernetic Love". Their second album, "Maximum Effect", starts with a track suggesting that Elvis has been given Everlasting Life Via Induced Suspendedanimation. Iron Maiden: The track "To Tame a Land" from "Piece of Mind" is about Dune. (Frank Herbert wouldn't let them call it "Dune", supposedly, 'cause he doesn't like heavy metal.) Jackson, Joe: "In the T.V. Age" from "Night And Day" (aliens as TV sets). Jade Warrior: LP "Horizon" contains "Images of Dune: a) Prescient Dawn, b) The Fremen, c) Journey on a Dream". Other albums contain fantasy and SF themes; like Mannheim Steamroller, another prototype "New Age" group. Most work done 1974-1978; other LP's include "Kites", "Waves", "Released", and "Way of the Sun". Frequent references to Oriental and Egyptian mythology. Jefferson Airplane/Starship: "Blows Against the Empire" (album) done by JA+Crosy, Nash, Freiberg. etc. "Have you seen the Saucers?" from"Thirty Seconds Over Winterland". Also did CSN&Y's "Wooden Ships" (post-nuclear holocaust) and "Crown of Creation" from Wyndham's "Re-Birth". Finally, "War Story" from "Bark" tells of rebellion in the US, mind control. "Hyperdrive" from "Dragonfly", "Modern Times" and "Alien" from "Modern Times", "Lightning Rose", "Awakening", "Freedom at Point Zero" from "Freedom at Point Zero", "Back from the Jaws of the Dragon" from "Winds of Change", "Connection", "Rose goes to Yale", "Champion" from "Nuclear Furniture". See also Paul Kantner's "The Planet Earth Rock and Roll Orchestra", a followup to "Blows...". Jethro Tull: Folk tale "Jack in the Green" from "Songs From the Wood", and "BroadSword" from "Broadssword and the Beast". Joel, Billy: "Miami 2017" from "Turnstiles"; a backwards reflection on our own future. John, Elton: "Rocket Man"...perhaps from Bradbury's "Illustrated Man"? Anyway, another road song. Also "I've Seen the Saucers"...from "Caribou". "I am Your Robot" from "Jump Up". Jonzun Crew: Album "Lost in Space" includes "Space Cowboy"--apparently not the same as the Steve Miller Band song. Joy Division: "V for Vendetta", an Alan Moore story by one of the members of J.D. Judas Priest: "The Green Manalishi with the Two-Pronged Crown". See also "Electric Eye" from "Screaming for Vengeance", an Orwellian song about covert surveillance drones in the sky. Kansas: Lots of stuff. See "Kansas", "Song For America", "Masque" and "Leftoverture" for details...note, though, that Kerry Livgren is heavily into Chrisianity, lending an alternative interpretation to many of the lyrics. King Crimson: "Epitaph" and "21st Century Schizoid Man" from "In The Court of the Crimson King". Kinks: "I wish I could Fly (Like Superman)". Kiss: "(Music from) The Elder", a soundtrack for a never-made film. Klattu: Best know for "Calling Occupants of Interplanetary Craft", and "Little Neutrino". Albums: "Klattu", "Hope".The Carpenters also recorded Calling Occupants...Apparently the song was conceived as prayer to be recited all over the globe to induce aliens to visit. Kraftwerk: Sf-themes occasionally. Certainly sounds sf-ish. Albums include "Autobahn", "Radioactivity", "ManMachine", "Computerworld", and "Trans-Europe Express". Led Zeppelin: "No Quarter" from "Houses of the Holy" is rather eerie, but no one is quite sure what it's about. "The Battle of Evermore", from Led Zep IV mentions Ringwraiths. Also see "Ramble On" on Led Zep I for mention of Mordor and Gollum. See also "Misty Mountain Hop" on Led Zep IV. Some speculation that "Stairway to Heaven" is about Saruman'sjourney to the west, but nobody seems to be sure. Also "Kashmir" from "Physical Grafitti". M: "The Official Secrets Act" (an innocent gets caught up in government plots and secret police, a la 1984) MC-5: On "Kick Out the Jams", "Rocket Reducer" and "Starship". Magma: "Inedits", "Udu Wudu"...sort of cross between German language research and H.P. Lovecraft. Tried to invent their own subculture. Curious reference to "Ork" on Udu Wudu. Mannfred Mann's Earth Band: "Solar Fire", "Time is Right". Marillion: "Grendel", i.e. Beowulf & friends is the B side of "Market Square Heroes", a 12-inch EP. Matthews, David: "Dune". Men at Work: "Helpless Automaton" from "Business as Usual" is about a robot falling in love with a human. Metallica: "Kthulu" [sic] on "Ride the Lightning". Midnight Oil: Albums "10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1" and "Red Sails in the Sunset" both have nuclear cautionary themes running thru them. "Red Sails" depicts Sydney, Australia after a nuclear strike. Moody Blues: "To Our Children's Children's Children". Move, The: "Yellow Rainbow" NRBQ: "Rocket 9". Nektar: "Remember the Future", "Recycle". Nelson, Bill/Red Noise: "Sound on Sound" has a number of songs with SF themes. Nena: "99 Luftballons" (WW3 & aftermath) New England: "L-5". New Model Army: "White Coats" talks about genetic engineering and its problems. New Musik: "On Islands" asks the question whether there might be other beings in the universe, and "Living by Numbers" rehashes the old numbers instead of names theme; both are found on the "Straight Lines" EP. Nilsson, Harry: See "Spaceman" from "Son of Schmilsson". Numan, Gary: "Cars", and the LP "Are Friends Electric", which discusses a future utilitarian society. Oingo Boingo: From the LP "Only a Lad", "Perfect System" and "Controller" both discuss Orwellian/Huxleyian societies. Omega: (Hungarian) has a record called "Idorablo" (add some dots and accentes here), meaning "Time Robber". The title suite contains one part called "Napot hoztam csillagot", "Sun and Stars I brought". Pallas: The album "The Sentinel" contains "Rise and Fall" and "Atlantis", which are both about Atlantis; also on this album is "Ark of Infinity", which is about a deep space hibernation ship. Peek, Kevin: "Starship Suite" from "Awakening", actually managed to work the word "cryogenic" into a song. Pink Floyd: Of course. "Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun" & "Astronomy Domine", (on "Ummagumma") are fairly representative. Much of their instrumental music has an sf/fantasy feel to it. See also "Piper at the Gates of Dawn", "Saucerful of Secrets", "Welcome to the Machine" (the latter from "Wish You Were Here"). Some speculation that "Set the Controls..." influenced Douglas Adam's writing about the group Disaster Area. Planet P: Albums: "Planet P" and "Pink World". Now known as Planet P Project. Platinum Bond: Album "Alien Shores". Police: "Walking on the Moon" from "Regatta de Blanc", "Wrapped Around Your Finger", and "Synchronicity II" (Loch Ness monster references, but not really an ST tune) from "Synchronicity", and "Demolition Man" (also done by Manfred Mann) from "Ghost in the Machine". Quantum Jump: (group lead by Rupert Hine) "No American Starship". Queen: "Thirty-Nine", from "A Night at the Opera", discusses the problems of relatavistic travel. Also "Machine World" from "The Works"; other albums include the Flash Gordon soundtrack and "Fun in Space", a solo album by drummer Roger Taylor. "Ogre Battle" (seems to be about the fantasy game Ogre) "March of the Black Queen" and "Seven Seas of Rhye" from "Queen II". The album "A Kind of Magic" contains fantasy tunes from the film "Highlander". Replacements: "Androgynous" off "Let it Be" discusses "unisex evolution" and how "Dick and Janes" who wear pants and skirts will be future outcasts. REM: Single "Superman". Rainbow: Heavy Metal. Some fantasy tracks, e.g. "Temple of the King", "16th century greensleeves", "Kill the King", "Stargazer". See the album "Rainbow Rising". Ramases: "Space Hymns", including great fold-out cover, studiowork by Godley & Creme; apparently expounds religious visions of infinite regress of microscopic universes. Ramatam: "In April Came the Dawning of the Red Suns" contains "Downrange Party". Band featured April Lawton, the female Jimi Hendrix. Reed, Lou: "Red Joystick" and "Down at the Arcade". Residents: "The Mole Trilogy", a conflict between two alien cultures. Rolling Stones: Wrote the ultimate road song for astronauts, "2000 Light Years From Home", which is on "Their Satanic Majesties' Request". Also "2000 Man", about how child-parent relationships still don't work, even in the 21st century. Roth, Uli John: "Electric Sun". Rundgren, Todd: "King Kong Reggae" and "Sons of 1984" from "Todd". See also Utopia. Rush: In "2112", the protagonist discovers an ancient guitar and winds up battling the dictatorial priesthood. "Red Barchetta" on "Moving Pictures"is similar, except the guitar is replaced by a car. (It's based on the story "A Nice Morning's Drive".) See also "Cygnux X-1" (thought to be a black hole), "Rivendell" (Tolkien reference), "The Necromancer". See also "The Body Electric" and "Red Sector A" from "Grace Under Pressure". See also "By-Tor and the Snow Dog" from "Fly by Night". "Hemispheres" (title track thereof) is a sequel to "Cygnus X-1". Saga: Canadian progressive synth-rock band with a series of songs which combine to tell a single story spread out over four albums, to wit: From "Saga": Chapter 4: Will It Be You?, and Chapter 6: Tired World; From "Images At Twilight": Chapter 1: Images, and Chapter 3: It's Time; from "Silent Knight": Chapter 2: Don't Be Late, and Chapter 7: Too Much To Lose; and from "Worlds Apart": Chapter 5: No Regrets, and Chapter 8: No Stranger. Roughly speaking, the story tells of space war, alien encounters, and the aftermath of war. Sanders, Ed: (A member of the Fugs at one time) released "Beer Cans on the Moon", which contains such gems as a song about a yodeling robot in love with Dolly Parton as well as some more topical songs. "Dark Carnival" sets a number of Bradbury's "Illustrated Man" stories to music. Sandy Bradley and the Small Wonder String Band(?): "Interstellar Sweetheart" Schilling, Peter: "Major Tom (Coming Home)"; perhaps a sequel to or re-telling of Bowie's "Space Oddity"? from "Error in the System" (originally titled "Fehlerim System") [also possibly based on the Bradbury story Kaleidescope]; also "The Noah Plan" (about an exodus from Earth), "Error in the System" (Earth as lostinterstellar colony), and others. "Things to Come" includes "Zone 804" (aliens come to bring peace) and "Lone Survivor" (man hides in bomb shelter, but war is averted; he's stuck). Scorpions: "Robot Man" on "In Trance". See ex-Scorption Uli Jon Roth. Sensational Alex Harvey Band: See "The Tale of The Giant Stone-Eater" from "Tomorrow Belongs to Me", and "Nightmare City" from "Rock Drill". Seventh Wave: "Things to Come" Shadowfax: Much sf/fantasy material. Sigue Sigue Sputnik: The album "Flaunt It" includes "21st Century Boy" along with other SF-sounding stuff; the lyrics are difficult to decipher. Sphynx: Another band led by Nik Turner, produced the album "Xitintoday" which was based on the Egyptian book ofthe dead. The flute was recorded inside the sarcophagus of the Great Pyramid. Spirit: "Future Games" has interspersed fragments of old "Star Trek" episodes between tunes. Starcastle: A Yes clone. First album has a nice piece, "Lady of the Lake". Stevens, Cat: "Freezing Steel" from "Catch Bull at Four". Stewart, Al: "The Sirens of Titan" (Vonnegut); also "Merlin's Time" from "24 carrots". Sting: "Dream of the Blue Turtles" has the track "Moon Over Bourbon Street" based, according to the liner notes, on Anne Rice's "Interview With A Vampire". Strange Advance: See "Nor Crystal Tears" from "Strange Advance 2wo" (not a typo). Stranglers, The: The album "The Gospel According to the Meninblack" is about a race of people from another planet who are raising humans on Earth for their food. Considering there are over 5 billion people now, they should be very happy. The Meninblack are first introduced in the song "Meninblack" on the album "The Raven". Styx: Usually has one sf-ish piece on each album. All of "Kilroy was Here" is a fable (this is the LP with "Mr. Roboto"). See also "Man of Miracles" and "Come Sail Away". There is some speculation that "Lords of the Ring" on "Pieces of Eight" is Tolkien-derived. Supertramp: Album "Brother Where You Bound". The Steve Miller Band: "Brave New World" and "Space Cowboy" from the album "Brave New World". Thorpe, Billy: "Children of the Sun" Tonio K: "Mars Needs Women" from "La Bomba". "Life in the Foodchain" has the songs "How Come I Can't See You in My Mirror?" (Answer: because the subject is a vampire.) Toyah: "Sheep farming in Barnet" - Near future high tech (mind to machine transfer) Messianic story. "Anthem", Story of a girl growing up in the present, but uses *lots* of SF imigary. "The Changling" seems to be a pre-post holocaust story but is open to other interpretations. See also "Martin Cowboy" from "Love is the Law". Tubes: "Attack of the Fifty Foot Woman", on "Completion Backward Principle"; also "Space Baby" and "Cathy's Clone". Twelfth Night: "We are Sane" from "Fact and Fiction" is about state control of thoughts by the implantation of a "component". Uriah Heep: "The Magician's Birthday", and "Demons and Wizards". Utopia: "Winston Smith Takes It on the Jaw" from "Oblivion". (Orwell's 1984) Possibly "Adventures in Utopia". Also "Utopia", "Abandon City" from "Oops, Wrong Planet" and "Emergency Splashdown" (which also appears on one of Roger Powell's solo albums). "RA" is heavily fantasy, including the epic "Singring and the Glass Guitar, an Electrified Fairy Tale". Vai, Steve: "Little Green Men" and "Next Stop Earth" from his album "Flex-Able". Van der Graff Generator: "Pioneers Over c", and others. (c = speed of light) Violinski: "No Cause for Alarm" (WW3 breaks out in your neighborhood) Visage: Redid Zager & Evans "2525"; also did some other SF-type material. Wakeman, Rick: "Journey to the Center of the Earth" retells Verne's story. Was (not Was): "Born to Laugh at Tornadoes" contains "Man vs. the Empire Brain Building" a cyberpunk piece in which the vocals mostly consist of the following line repeated over and over: "In my life there's just three things: Man vs. Nature Man vs. Woman and Man vs. the Empire Brain Building" Wayne, Jeff: "War of the Worlds". H.G. Wells' story with Richard Burton doing narration, and awful music (purely a personal opinion ;-) ). Weird Al Yankovic: "Yoda" (to the tune of "Lola") and "Slime Creatures from Outer Space", an original music-tribute to B-movies; both are from "Dare to Be Stupid". Who, The: "Tommy" is half-fantasy, half-opera. "905" from "Who Are You?". Also "Rael" from "The Who Sell Out". "Baba O'Riley" from "Who's Next" seems to possibly be about some post-holocaust world. Wings: "Nineteen Eighty-Five" from "Band on the Run". Also "Magneto and the Titanium Man" and "Venus and Mars (Reprise)" from "Venus and Mars". XTC: "Reel by Reel" (the government can hear and record your thoughts); "This World Over" from "The Big Express" which is a post-nuclear holocaust cautionary tale. Yes: Much sf-oriented work. Try "Astral Traveller", "Starship Trooper" (Heinlein?), "The Gates of Delirium". See also Jon Anderson's "Olias of Sunhillow" and Anderson & Vangelis's song "Mayflower" from "The Friends of Mr. Cairo". See also "Then" with references to telepathy. Also, "Arriving UFO" from "Tormato". Young, Kenny: LP "Last Stage for Silverworld" Young, Neil: "After the Gold Rush", and "Ride my Llama" from "Rust Never Sleeps". On the album "Trans", see "Computer Age", "We R In Control", and "Sample and Hold". Zager & Evans: "In the Year 2525"; dated but cute; was #1 when Armstrong walked on the moon. Zappa, Frank, and the Mothers: From "Roxy and Elsewhere", "Cheapnis", the story of a grade Z monster movie. "Thing-Fish" (evil scientist, etc.) Also "I'm the Slime" from "Over-Nite Sensation". Zevon, Warren: "Werewolves of London" from "Excitable Boy", just for fun. Tangerine Dream, Jean-Michael Jarre, Return to Forever, Weather Report, Vangelis, Klaus Schultz, Deodata, Eno, Jean-Luc Ponty, Michael Urbaniak, Stomu Yamashta & Go, The Enid, Peter Michael Hamel, Bo Hansson, Mannheim Steamroller, Lancaster & Lumley: ...have all been listed down here because several people have pointed out that "sounding like SF" doesn't make it SF music. Note that some of these people have done some SF soundtracks, and that some of them have done instrumental material with SF/fantasy titles. Hitchhiker's Guide: Just a note that the theme music for THHGTTG is "Journey of the Sorcerer" from the Eagles' "One of These Nights". Marvin is credited with a single called "Marvin", backed with "Metal Man". Tim Souness did a single of the HitchHiker's Guide theme. Disaster Area is credited with "Only the End of the World Again", the B side of the theme single. Hastily-assembled montage of names of people who sent this stuff in: Alan Greig, Alastair Milne, Alex Melnick, Anderson, Becky Slocombe, Bill Kaufman, Brandon Allbery, Brent Woods, Brian Ritchie, Brian Yamauchi, Bruce Holloway, Carlo N. Samson, Charlie, Chisholm, Craig Wilcox, Dan Duval, Daniel Dern, Dave Berry, Dave Fiedler, Dave Platt, Dave Rosik, David Adler, David Gibbs, Jon Reeves, Doug Alan, Doug Mink, Edwin Wiles, Ellen Keyne Seebacher, Francini, Freeman, G. T. Samson, Gareth, Gareth Husk, Gerard Lachac, Greg Samson, Hall, Henry, Husk, Jack Ostroff, Jay, Jed Hartman, Jef Poskanzer, Jeff Rogers, Jessie, Jim, John, John Romkey, John Turner, Jonathan D. Trudel, Joseph McLean, Ken Fricklas, Kyle Grieser, Lewis Barnett, Lionel Marcus, Mark Schlagenhauf, Martin, Michael Caplinger, Mijjil, Miles Bader, Nicholas Simicich, Paul S. R., Peter Alfke, Randall Shane, Rich Kulawiec, Robert Pietkivitch, Russ Williams, Scott A., Sean Ellis, Sheila Coyazo, Shelli Meyers, Smith, Steve, Steve Herring, Steve Lionel, Stewart, Stuart Sullivan, Terry Poot, The Roach Above Reproach, Thomas Gayler, Tim, Tom Galloway, Tynor, Vlach, Vogel, Wayne Barber, William Ingogly, edge!walker, lary%ssdevo, Guy Middleton, Berry Kercheval, Chuck Koelbel, Thomas Gayler, Andy Tucker, Matthew Belmonte, Stephen Pearl, Can Altinbay, Richard Caley, Tony Towers, Brad Templeton, Jeff Lewis, John Relph, William J. Richard, Tim Smith, Paul Czarnecki, Tony Towers, John A. Mariani, Erland Sommarskog.

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