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Page 32 SONG Dane-Geld By: Rudyard Kipling It is always a temptation to an armed and agile nation. To call upon a neighbor and say, We invaded you last night, we are quite prepared to fight, Unless you pay us cash to go away. And that is called asking for Dane-geld, And the people who ask it explain That you've only to pay them the Dane-geld And then you'll be rid of the Dane! It is always a temptation to a rich and lazy nation To puff and look important and to say "Though we know we should defeat you, we have not the time to meet you. We will therefore pay you cash to go away." And that is called paying the Dane-geld, But we've proved it again and again. That once you have paid him the Dane-geld, You never get rid of the Dane. It is wrong to put temptation in the path of any nation, For fear they should succomb and go astray. So when you are requested to pay up or be molested, You will find it better policy to say: We never pay any one Dane-geld, No matter how trifling the cost, For the end of that game is oppression and shame, And the nation that plays it is lost! Page 33 SONG Drink to the Sword Written by: Ragnar ( Usually done as a two person piece. ) "What shall we do when tomorrow comes early And what shall we do when tomorrow comes nigh?" "We'll take to the longships and set the sail smartly We'll take to the longships and set the sail high." CHORUS - after every verse. And drink to the sword that sings merry in battle, And drink to our foemen who gallantly die. Let's lift up our horns and drink deep 'till tomorrow. Let's drink deep the mead 'till the barrel runs dry. "What shall we do if the north wind is blowing And what shall we do if the north wind is tame?" "By sail or by oar we will hasten to England To pillage and plunder for fortune and fame." "But what shall we do if a storm comes a-squalling With thunder and lightning and rain on the sea?" "We'll bail out the water and lift up our voices And sign with the hammer so Odin will see." "And what shall we do when we land there in England Beside a tall fortress so strong and so bold?" "We'll pound on our shields 'till the walls are a-crumbling Then cut down the soldiers and take all the gold." "But what shall we do if the soldiers are many A thousand or more who will stand unafraid?" "Then... (pause) ... We'll sing them a song with great smiles on our faces, For we are but merchants who've come here to trade!" Page 34 Lord of the Dance SONG When she danced on the water and the wind was her horn, The Lady laughed and everything was born. And when she lit the sun and the light gave him birth The Lord of the Dance first appeared on the earth. CHORUS - after every verse Dance, dance, wherever you may be, I am the Lord of the Dance, said he I live in you, if you live in me, And I lead you all in the dance, said he. I dance in the circle when the flames leap up high; I dance in the fire and I never, ever die. I dance in the waves of the bright summer sea, For I am the Lord of the waves' mystery. I sleep in the kernel and I dance in the rain. I dance in the wind and through the waving grain, And when you cut me down I care nothing for the pain, In the Spring I'm the Lord of the Dance once again. I dance at the Sabbat when you dance out the spell, I dance and sing that everyone be well, And when the dancing's over do not think that I am gone To live is to dance, so I dance on and on. The horn of the Lady cast it's sound cross the plain The birds took the notes and gave them back again 'Till the sound of her music was a song in the sky, And to that song there is one reply. The moon in her phases and the tides of the sea The movement of the earth and the seasons that will be Are the rhythm for the dancing and a promise through the years That the Dance goes on through our joy and tears. They danced in the darkness and they danced in the night, They danced on the earth and everything was light. They danced out the darkness and they danced in the dawn And the day of their dancing still goes on and on. I gaze on the heavens and I gaze on the earth, And I feel the pain of dying and rebirth, And I lift my head in gladness and in praise for the day Of the Dance of the Lord and the Lady gay. Page 35 SONG Sutan's Song By: Stephen the Juggler Tune: The Mongol Birthday Song (or The Birthday Dirge.) which, in turn, is to the tune of Volga Boatmen. The weather's bad, your horse goes lame. Remember Sutan gets the blame. CHORUS - after every verse Sutan Bloodaxe. Sutan Bloodaxe. Sutan's house is called Longtooth. They're loud and tough and not quite couth. Every Rhino-Hider knows, When Sutan swings, you call his blows. Outside Sutan lookes quite rough. Inside he's a powderpuff. Here's what Sutan likes to eat. Meat and Meat and Meat and Meat. Your tent falls down, Your soup needs salt. Your sword has rust, It's Sutan's fault. Many fight him, many die. I don't know why they even try. Sutan never ever sins But boy does Sutan's evil twin. Someday he may be our king. Isn't that a scary thing. Oak, Ash, and Thorn Page 36 (Also called A Tree Song.) SONG By: Rudyard Kipling Of all the trees that grow so fair Old England to adorn, Greater are none beneath the Sun Than Oak, and Ash, and Thorn. Sing Oak, and Ash, and Thorn, good sirs, (All of a Midsummer's morn!) Surely we sing of no little thing In Oak, and Ash, and Thorn. Oak of the clay lived many a day Or ever AEneas began. Ash of the Loam was a lady at home When Brut was an outlaw man. Thorn of the Down saw New Troy Town (From which was London born); Witness hereby the ancientry Of Oak, and Ash, and Thorn. Yew that is old in churchyard-mould He breedeth a mighty bow, Alder for shoes do wise men choose And beech for cups also. But when ye have killed, and your bowl is spilled And your shoes are clean outworn Back ye must speed for all that ye need To Oak, and Ash, and Thorn. Ellum she hateth mankind, and waiteth Till every gust be laid To drop a limb on the head of him That anyway trusts her shade. But whether a lad be sober or sad, Or mellow with ale from the horn, He will take no wrong when he lieth along 'Neath Oak, and Ash, and Thorn. Oh, do not tell the Priest our plight, Or he would call it a sin; But-we have been out in the woods all night, A-conjuring Summer in! And we bring you news by word of mouth- Good news for cattle and corn- Now is the Sun come up from the South With Oak, and Ash, and Thorn! Sing Oak, and Ash, and Thorn, good sirs (All of a Midsummer's morn)! England shall bide 'till Judgment Tide By Oak, and Ash, and Thorn! Note: When sung, the last four lines of the first verse is usually done as a chorus, repeating after every verse. Page 37 The Lying Song SONG (Suggested verses are given, but the point is to write your own, preferably about people present. Go wild. It's supposed to be a lie.) Chorus: (After each verse) (Group sings chorus and responses.) You're lying, you're lying, I can tell you're lying. I'll never trust a single thing you say to me. Don Tivar never calls his blows (You're lying, you're lying.) Don Tivar never calls his blows, (I doubt what you do say.) Don Tivar never calls his blows, Unless you hit him in the nose. ( I'll never trust a single thing you say to me. ) Adelicia has no pretty clothes. Except for these, and she borrowed those. Oh, Vashti cannot dance at all. With every spin she takes a fall. Don Galen is a lazy bum. He's always sitting on his thumbs. Oh, Stephen cannot hold his balls, They're always bouncing off the walls. Sir Gunther never learned to fight His belt is only painted white. Valeria cannot write a poem. They never rhyme or even fit the meter very well. Duke Lloyd is gentle, soft and meek He always turns the other cheek. Steppes Warlord is a small event I wonder where the people went. Don Alaric never parried well A single blow and down he fell. Joselyn cannot cook a feast She spends the most and serves the least. Lord Sebastian cannot throw His knife and axe are just for show. For Twelfth Night no one ever sews Just wear your oldest tourney clothes. Page 38 SONG The Scottsman Well, a Scotsman clad in kilt left the bar one evening fair, And one could tell by how he walked that he'd drunk more than his share. He fumbled round until he could no longer keep his feet, And he stumbled off into the grass to sleep beside the street. CHORUS - repeat after every verse Ring-ding-diddle-iddle-I-dee-oh, Ring-dy-diddly-I-oh, (last line of previous verse). About that time two young & lovely girls just happened by. One says to the other with a twinkle in her eye, "See yon sleeping Scotsman, so strong and handsome built, "I wonder if it's true what they don't wear beneath their kilt." They crept up on that sleeping Scotsman quiet as could be, Lifted up his kilt about an inch so they could see. And there, behold for them to view, beneath his Scottish skirt, Was nothin' more than God had graced him with upon his birth. They marveled for a moment, then one said, "We must be gone. "Let's leave a present for our friend before we move along." As a gift they left a blue silk ribbon tied into a bow. Around the bonny star the Scotsmans kilt did lift & show. Well,the Scotsman woke to nature's call & stumbled to a tree. Behind a bush he lifts his kilt & gawks at what he sees. And in a startled vioce he says to what's before his eyes, "Oh, lad I don't know where ye've been but I seň ye've won first prize." Page 39 SONG Boozin' (I found this in a collection by Mistress Sir Trude. Get a copy!) Oh, what are the joys of a single young man? * Why boozing, bloody well boozing! And what is he doing whenever he can? ** He's Boozing bloody well boozing! You may think I'm wrong, you may think I'm right I'm not going to argue, I know you can fight But what do you think we'll be doing tonight *** Why Boozing bloody well boozing! CHORUS: Boozing Boozing just you and I Boozing boozing when we are dry Some do it openly some on the sly But we all are bloody well boozing! And what are the jous of a poor married man * And what is he doing whenever he can ** He goes out a shoping, makes many a call He comes home at night and he gives his wife all But what brings him home hanging onto the wall *** CHORUS And what does the salvation army run down * And what are they banning in every town ** They stand on street corners they rave and they shout They shout about things they know nothing about But what are they doing when the lights are turned out ***

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