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From: Mike Fisher 18 Jul 94 23:18 To : All Subj: Eugenie Scott Lecture Approximately five months ago I learned that the main chapters on evolution were being skipped in my daughter's biology class. One of the first things I did was ask for some help on this conference. A couple of people responded and put me in touch with Eugenie Scott, President of the National Center of Science Education. Here is an update. In addition to sending us a lot of important information, Ms. Scott put us in touch with the authors of my daughter's biology textbook. The authors', when contacted, both wrote letters to the Science Department Chairperson and the Associate Superintendent. These letters along with the information provided by Ms. Scott were successful in convincing the district administration that excluding evolution in the teaching of biology was not productive in the education of young adults. We have been assured that ALL teachers will be including evolution during the teaching of biology. We will, of course, check to make sure this is being done but I have much respect for the district Superintendent and the Associate Superintendent. In the process there have been several local newspaper articles highlighting this story and even the Los Angeles Times included this issue on a story regarding the rise of religious groups in Colorado Springs. The LA Times article appeared on July 6th, started on the front page and is entitled, "Rise of Religious Groups Divides Conservative Town." As a plus to all this, Eugenie Scott came to town and spoke to a group of interested citizens on the teaching of evolution and "creation science" in the schools. Her lecture was very interesting and quite informative. The most interesting parts of her lecture was the explanation of the continuum of creationism. There is no such thing as one type of creationism. It can be broken down in several parts. At the extreme are the flat-earthers, of which there are still about 200. They believe that the earth is a flat circle, like a record because the Bible says so. Next are the geo-centrics, who accept the earth as a sphere, believe that the sun and stars rotate around the earth. Young earth creationists compose the largest number of supporters and compose the next group. They believe that the earth is, at most, 6,000 years old and that dinosaurs were alive while modern man was. Dinosaurs were on Noah's Ark for over a year while the flood waters receded. Ms. Scott's comment to this was that the Flinstones is really a documentary. In the progression, old earth creationists are next. They believe that the earth and all life was created in six days but that the days were either very long or that there were long periods of time between those six days. Old earth creationists do accept that the earth was formed billions of years ago. The next group is probably the one with the largest amount of support and it is referred to as the "theistic evolutionists." Most religious people believe that God is the Creator and that he works through the process of evolution. Throughout the lecture, Ms. Scott emphasized that accepting evolution as science is not antithetical to religion. Ms. Scott and the National Center for Science Education will provide materials, presentations and support for anyone who is involved in the creation/evolution issue. NCSE PO Box 9477 Berkeley, CA 94709-0477

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